Asparagus Cheese Tart

Another recipe from the Costco Magazine.  They had me at asparagus this time.  I’ve mentioned my 2 favorite foods are watermelon and asparagus, so you know I’m in.  This one looked totally la-di-da and yet super easy.  Our favorite nephew, his wife and daughter were here and it was voted a total winner.  Our 2 year old great niece even helped roll out the puff pastry dough and grate the cheese.

This is a really nummy nibble.  I will be making it all year, or at least as long as I can get fresh asparagus.  Look at the intensity on her face as she grates the cheese.  Isn’t it more important  than the squiggly cut puff pastry?  Yeah, I think so.  I wish you could have seen her piercing the pastry with a fork.  It sort of reminded me of the Psycho shower scene.  She was into it.

Heat the oven to 400 degrees.

1 tablespoon flour

1 sheet (about 8 ounces) frozen puff pastry, thawed

1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese

1/2 cup grated Gruyere Cheese

1 pound medium asparagus, trimmed

S and P to taste

Sprinkle flour onto the work surface, roll out the pastry dough to a 14 x 9 inch rectangle.  Trim the dough for neat edges, then transfer to a parchment lined baking sheet.  Score the pastry dough lightly with a 1-inch border on all sides.  Pierce the interior dough with a fork.  Bake until light golden, about 10 to 12 minutes.

Remove the pastry from the oven and sprinkle with the cheeses.  Place the trimmed asparagus on the interior of the tart, alternating with ends and tips.  Drizzle the asparagus with the olive oil, scattering thyme on top and season with salt and pepper.

Bake until puff pastry is golden and asparagus is tender, about 15 minutes.  Serve warm or at room temperature.  Makes about 6 servings.

*  From the Recipe Box:

This recipe was from the March 2020 Costco Connection.  I get really good recipes from that publication.

G would like to see twice the cheese on the tart.  We like our cheese.

Even with a 2 year old sous chef, it turned out fabulous.  Appearance isn’t everything.  Let these kids help people.

and remember:  Erin go Bragh my darlings.  Big kiss, Lynn

 

Cheese Balls

You know, I’m older than dirt per my children.  As a result, I have recipes that predate disco.  This one was in mom’s recipe box.  Cheese balls were a really big deal in the 80’s.  You could roll them into balls, logs or just serve them in a bowl (my personal choice).  I do like store bought cheese spreads, but this one is so creamy.  I also like that you can make it your own.  I like more garlic than the average person.  A dash of Sriracha totally changes the taste profile of this cheese.

This one calls for some ingredients you might not be able to find easily, but no matter, we can fake it.  I love having this in the freezer.  Whether you form it and roll it in nuts or keep it in a bowl, it’s so handy to have this.  I keep them in easy to defrost sizes.  You never know when someone is going to drop in and this makes a great nibble.  I like it on cheesy crackers or crustini, but it’s equally good on celery or sliced cucumbers.  You need to make some today.

 

1/2 pound butter

8 ounces cream cheese

1 5 ounce jar each Bacon, Roka, Olde English and Pimento cheese (Kraft makes these)

1 garlic clove

mix thoroughly and refrigerate overnight

Roll in into balls and then into finely chopped walnuts and parsley

Freeze until ready to use.

*  From the Recipe Box:

The Kraft cheese jars are becoming increasingly difficult to find.  I usually use what I can find and then replace the rest with a grated cheddar mix.  It still tastes wonderful.

I like a little more garlic than this, 2 to 3 cloves are my go to.

It really does freeze ever so well and keeps for several months.  Give it an hour or 2 to thaw out.

and remember:  You have to think anyway, so why not think big?  Big kiss, Lynn

Gougeres

G and I have spa days and drink the waters.  Basically, we’re having drinks and nibbles at an Island establishment every month or so.  We like making things special and we’ll go hither and yon to find new experiences.  We’ve been together a long time and you need to keep having new adventures or things go stale.  We were lucky enough to enjoy the gougeres at Prima Bistro recently.  I’m now a fan, so I needed a recipe.

If you want to get technical, we’re talking cream puffs with Gruyere cheese.  They’re light and very satisfying.  If you love cream puffs, you will love these even more.  The flavor of the Gruyere raises these to a whole new level.  Now picture your Martini in one hand and a gougeres in the other.  Life is good.

  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 1 stick (4 ounces) butter, cut into tablespoons
  • Large pinch of coarse salt
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 4 large eggs
  • 3 1/2 ounces shredded Gruyère cheese (1 cup), plus more for sprinkling
  • Freshly ground pepper
  • Freshly grated nutmeg (I’m not a nutmeg fan, so you will have to decide)

*  From the Recipe Box:

I like Alain Ducasse’s recipe.  Picture a 5 star recipe with almost 5K reviews.

If you’re good with a piping bag, give it a try.  I’m not so hot, no hand strength.

I’d rather make approximately 18 per batch but still bake the same amount of time.  I like them a tad smaller and a bit firmer.  It’s all about holding the Martini.

and remember one of the best lines from the Princess Bride:  Who said life is fair; where is that written?   Big kiss, Lynn

Faux Deep Fried Cheese

This one is totally weird and totally easy.  I love having the kiddos help me with this one.  While it is not fried, it will taste like it.  Everyone seems to have cheese sticks in their refrigerators these days.  It does not matter what brand or flavor, they all work.  Someone always orders cheese sticks when we’re out and about, so this is a good one to try.

Cut string cheese into bite sized pieces, 3 to 4 from each stick.

Dip each piece in milk and then bread crumbs.  I use Panko, because I like Panko, but seasoned bread crumbs are equally nummy.

Place on a baking sheet lined with parchment.

Bake at 425 degrees for 5 to 7 minutes

Serve with Marinara sauce or a good chunky salsa.  I also like sweet chili sauce or a red pepper jelly.

You’re going whoa, these don’t look like cheese sticks.  I have to give you a heads up about this one.  I got a phone call, as can happen and instead of toasted rounds, I ended up with crispy flats.  They still taste good, but I couldn’t in good conscience not admit my error.  This one has sweet chili sauce on it and it was lip smacking good.  I still feel like a maroon, but I always make the recipe right before I post it, so what you see is what you get.

*  From the Recipe Box:

You can use any bread crumbs.  I originally used Italian seasoned bread crumbs and thought they were fabulous until Panko came into my life.

Leave them in the milk for a moment and then immediately roll them in the bread crumbs.

These aren’t going to stay soft for long, but if you have some hang around, they taste great in tomato soup.

and remember what Tom Bodett said:  “They say a person needs just three things to be truly happy in this world: someone to love, something to do, and something to hope for.”  I hope you get all 3.  Big kiss, Lynn

Stuffed Dates

I know what you’re thinking, ‘I needed this recipe before the holidays, not after’.  You’re wrong.  It’s never too early or too late for a good nibble.  We love this recipe.  I have to give G credit for the goat cheese.  He’s a big fan and it was his idea to start using it instead of cream cheese.  This is the complete combination of sweet and savory.

We usually approach this as a team effort.  It doesn’t take forever, it only seems that way if you’re doing it by yourself.  We are lucky enough to have a large bulk food department at our local grocery store here on the Island.  If you can get pitted date, by all means do so.  It’s hard enough making the slice for filling without going all the way through the date.  This is a sticky operation.  Also, if you’re a good Norwegian like me, the minute you start smelling dates, you want a date bar.  I’ll make some soon and share Grandma Olson’s recipe with you.

This much bacon will make about 24 stuffed dates.  G and I usually double this depending on how many people we plan on serving.

12 ounce package bacon (you don’t want the thick cut style)

1 pound of pitted dates

7 ounces goat cheese

Cut the bacon in half.  This will yield approximately 24 slices.  Slice the dates to give yourself cheese access.  Fill each date with about 1 teaspoon of goat cheese.  Wrap each one with a slice of bacon.  Skewer with a toothpick.  This will hold everything in place and give you a handle for when it’s time to eat them.  Place on a cookie sheet topped with parchment or a silpat.

Bake at 425 degrees for 20 to 30 minutes, turning them about half way through.

*  From the Recipe Box:

With a 7 ounce package you will have plenty of cheese to make a couple of batches.

We like to serve them warm or room temperature.

and remember:  You are the result of 4 billion years of evolution; act like it!  Big kiss, Lynn

Norwegian Seed Crackers

I think I may have OCD.  Once I get on topic, I can’t seem to shake it.  Currently, I’m totally committed to crackers.  I love, love, love crackers.  I always have and I always will.  Part of it is my deep love of soup and you have to have crackers if you have soup.

I’m also looking for things to cook with Gluten-free Girl.  She’s coming up this weekend and is always up for a new cooking experience.  Please don’t judge them until you taste them.  They are pretty good.  You simply can’t make everyone happy.

dry ingredients

  • 3 1/2 ounces pumpkin seeds (approximately 5/8 cup if you don’t have a scale)
  • 3 1/2 ounces sunflower seeds (5/8 cup)
  • 5 ounces sesame seeds (1 1/8 cups)  I used 50/50 black and regular sesame seeds.  This did affect the color of my crackers.  Next time, only a sprinkling of the black.
  • 5 ounces flax seed (1 1/8 cups)
  • 1 1/2 ounces chia seed (1/3 cup)
  • 1 ounce or 6 tablespoons psyllium husk powder
  • 1½ teaspoon salt
  • 2 teaspoon baking powder

wet ingredients

  • 3 cups water
  •  a smidgen less than 1/2 cup oil (I use grape seed oil, without flavor)

Directions

Mix all the dry stuff and stir it together.

Mix the wet stuff and stir it all together.

Let it rest for half an hour until it becomes a solid dough.

Divide the dough into 4 equal pieces.

Put the dough onto a piece of baking paper. Add another piece of baking paper on top.

Flatten the dough with a baking roll or the like.

Put the dough on a baking pan while still inside the baking two papers.

Remove the top piece of baking paper.

Bake for approximately 30-45 minutes 350 degrees.  If the dough is not completely baked after 30 minutes, turn it over and remove the baking paper to make it easier for the steam to escape. The paper might stick a bit.

Take it out of the oven, remove the baking paper and allow it to cool. I use a cooling rack. If the paper sticks and is hard to remove, the crispbread is not fully baked.

Break it gently into bits the sizes you prefer.

*  From the Recipe Box:

Until you have tried the recipe a few times in your own oven, it’s a good idea to check the dough when it has gotten 20 minutes. It is so thin that it easily burns in the corners. For example, in my oven, I have to both turn the baking trays and switch the top and bottom trays after 20 minutes and then every 10 minutes.

Check out more Nordic Nut Breads at Kvalifood.com

and remember:  Pain makes you stronger; tears make you braver; a broken heart makes you wiser; and alcohol makes you not remember any of that crap.  Thank you alcohol.  Big kiss, Lynn

 

Scalloped Oysters

I’m not a fan of oysters.  I want to be, but I simply cannot get past the mouth feel.  Each summer I try to eat one.  The operative word here is try.  I live near some of the best oyster beds in the world.  I can’t get enough clams and mussels, so what’s the difference?  I can’t figure it out.

This dish is a holiday tradition in my family.  It was always on the buffet every Christmas eve and it was always eaten to the last crumb.  What I find amusing is my mother who originally made it would not eat it, I took over and do not eat it and this year C the MP made it and won’t eat it.  What a bunch of maroons!

We use oysters in a jar for this recipe.  Shellfish is very seasonal in our area and we’re total rule followers when it comes to fish and game regulations.  Since you will be baking them, you won’t notice the difference.

1 pint oysters

4 tablespoons oyster liquor

4 tablespoons cream

½ cup dry bread crumbs

1 cup cracker crumbs (Ritz or something equally light and buttery)

½ cup melted butter

S & P

Mix together bread and cracker crumbs.  Stir in butter.  Put a thin layer in the bottom of a shallow baking dish, approximately 8 x 8.

Mix together the cream and oyster liquor.

Put a layer of oysters on the crumbs.  Sprinkle with salt and pepper.

Add ½ of the oyster liquor mixture.  Sprinkle with some of the bread crumbs.

Repeat layers and cover with the remaining crumb mixture.

Bake 30 minutes in a 400 degree oven.

*  from the Recipe Box:

Mom would make this every Christmas for Dad, P, and L once she joined our group.  You either love oysters or you don’t, but everyone who does loves this dish.

Oyster liquor is the liquid in the jar with the oysters.  Drain and save to use in the recipe.

and remember:  You are only going to be as good as the people you surround yourself with, so be brave enough to let go of those who keep weighing you down.  Big kiss, Lynn