Norwegian Meatballs

Don’t even be thinking I got the name wrong.  How many times have I said I was Norwegian?  How many times have I said I was Swedish?  So, what kind of meatballs do you think I make?  Exactly.  I had a bit of an epiphany the other day.  I was reading about Sean Brock, one of the best Southern chefs.  I kind of have a crush on him; he’s all that and more.  I was getting ready to order his book when I thought, Why?  My family is not from the South.  None of my family emigrated to the South.  The few times I was in the South it made me nervous, so WHY?

So, back to the epiphany.  Why am I studying the South when I’ve got my own heritage to study.  So, here we go, it’s time to go Nordic.  Before the libraries were closed, I’d checked out a few books to explore.   The New Nordic:  Recipes from a Scandinavian Kitchen and Sweet Paul Eat and Make were my favorites and I ordered both.  Remember my rule:  Check it out twice before ordering so I don’t have buyers remorse.  So, let’s make Norwegian Meatballs.

2 pounds ground meat

2 cloves minced garlic

2 eggs

1 cup grated Parmesan (this is my non-Norwegian addition)

1 ½ tablespoons chopped parsley (I had no parsley, bummer)

S & P

1 ½ cups lukewarm water

Olive oil if you’re frying

½ cup panko

Combine meat with garlic, parsley, cheese, eggs, S&P.

Blend in panko.

Slowly add water, ½ cup at a time.  The mixture should be very moist but hold its shape.  I use it all.

Form into meatballs.  And the easiest way to do that is to form the meatball mixture into a rectangle and cut it into squares.  You will get the exact number of meatballs you need and they will all be of equal size.  (I know, and you thought I was just another pretty face.)

Fry in olive oil or bake at 425 degrees for 20 to 30 minutes, turning after 10 or 15 minutes.

Next is the Brown Gravy.

2 1/2 cups beef broth

2 tablespoons flour

2 to 3 tablespoons butter

S & P to taste

Make a roux of the butter and flour.  Brown for a few minutes.  Slowly add the beef broth.  Allow to thicken.

I serve this with rice, noodles or mashed potatoes and of course, a spoonful of ligonberry jam.  If you’re feeling really Norwegian, go for mashed rutabagas or cauliflower.

*  From the Recipe Box:

The New Nordic is going to make you hungry for a trip to Norway.

Couple of notes:  I do not go to the store for 1 item.  Currently I can’t go to the store at all, so you’re right, that is raspberry jam not ligonberry jam.  I had no beef broth, so I used au jus.  I didn’t love it, but I’m a firm believer in faking it.

and remember:   Oscar Wilde said it best:  Never love anyone who treats you like you are ordinary.   Big kiss, Lynn

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